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Nov 13, 2015 4:36PM

Meet 5 NYC Artists/Internet Xperts Doing Cool Things RN

Curated by @artbabygirl.

Grace Miceli is a curator based in New York who's also a pretty great artist in her own right. Plus, she's an expert at the internet and making cute clothes we wanna wear on our bodies. In light of all this, we asked her to hand-pick her top five artists working in NYC ATM and she chose some absolute crackers. Peruse their fine work above and get to know them a bit better below. Because they're worth it.

Name: Lula Hyers (lulahyers66)

Where's home?
NYC.

If you had to describe your artistic output in five words, what would you call it?
Honest, intimate, colourful, nostalgic (sorry that's only four). 

Who inspires you?
Many people, but especially my friends. We are always pushing each other creatively and everyone always helps with each other's projects — it's nice to have people who want to help you make more interesting things.

What's unique about making art in NY?
I might be biased because New York raised me, but this city has so many things to offer. For a photographer it's a big playground — I have access to so many environments without going more than an hour from where I live. There are so many opportunities and a lot of amazing artists there that keep me inspired.

What's been the most significant work or body of work you've made so far?
I'm not sure if there has been one project that felt more important than the others, but the 'Ivy and Gabriel' series was the project that most people liked the best.

What do you want to be when you grow up?
I'm not sure. Hopefully I'll try as many things as I can before I decide that.

***

Name: Terrell Davis (@nikewater)

Where's home?
Currently my parents' house in New Jersey. My second home is in Manhattan @ the to.be HQ on East 8th.

If you had to describe your artistic output in five words, what would you call it?
Just do what you want.

Who inspires you?
Lots of people! Right now, I'm being real inspired by Karim Rashid, Ian Anderson, Simon Whybray and Andrea Giacobbe, to name a few.

What's unique about making art in NY?
There's always something happening around here, so I always feel inspired. I always take mental notes of things when I'm walking around either with friends or by myself. As long as I've been working down here I haven't seen a good portion of the city, so I'm always excited to be in a part of NY I'm not familiar with.

What's been the most significant work or body of work you've made so far?
Probably the new collection I just made for Electric Objects. Or this new shirt I collaborated on with manga artist Jiraiya for this company that specialises in all things gay manga called MASSIVE.

What do you want to be when you grow up?
An icon. I want to be the person other artists coming up (like me) look up to. I want to help a young artist realise their potential in the same way people I've met in NY helped me.

***

Name: Monica Hernandez (@monicagh_

Where's home?
I'd have to say home only exists between the times of 8am and 12pm when the sun comes into my bedroom-turned-studio in the Bronx — things feel comfortable during that time.

If you had to describe your artistic output in five words, what would you call it?
Sorry about this mess, Mom.

Who inspires you?
I tend to find myself inspired by artists that incorporate their body into their work — Ana Mendieta, LaToya Ruby Frazier and Francesca Woodman to name a few. I'm also inspired a lot by my family and our culture. My inability to remain complacent and my need to question everything is owed to my family, our progression in a new country and how we remain critical and open everywhere we go.

What's unique about making art in NY?
I'd have to say the stress of just inhabiting this city is what is unique and kind of is the power source for a lot of us, consciously or subconsciously. There's nothing more physically, mentally or spiritually activating (sometimes positive, but mostly negative) than being trapped underground in a train that has been delayed for the third time this trip, smooshed between a construction worker and a religious preacher, 15 minutes late to work. I think that kind of stuff makes New Yorkers ruthless caffeine and nicotine addicts with a superficial, psychopathic ambition that mixes with a sort of endearing hidden inner anxious and confused baby deer self. You know? And also, that materialistic abundance and first world privilege — it's kind of like winning a lifetime supply of Oreos, and this is the most amazing thing that could possibly ever happen to anyone ever, and then you eat so many you get sick and you throw up and get diabetes and get your leg amputated. That's what art making in NYC feels like. I think… you got a lot, and it's too much, and everything goes wrong, and you die, but the dollar pizza is great.

What's been the most significant work or body of work you've made so far?
I think it'd have to be this black and white 35mm self portraiture photo series I did a year ago. I haven't ever shared it, but it was my first conscious and personal exploration of body and movement. Making it was a turning point for me because I was able to run and jump and contort freely in front of a camera for the first time, and that experience is still a major influence in the work I'm creating today.

What do you want to be when you grow up?
The only thing I want is to be able to look back and have things make sense and to be able to continue creating. Oh, I am also trying to decide between abandoning civilization and living in the desert and just becoming a writer or moving to a moist forest with a farm and a family and learning to bake vegan croissants from scratch that taste like buttery croissants — will keep you updated.

***

Name: Tyler Mitchell (@tylersphotos)

Where's home? 
Originally: Atlanta and Georgia. Creatively and mentally: probably the Internet.

If you had to describe your artistic output in five words, what would you call it?
Trying to get colours right.

Who inspires you? 
Dev Hynes. I'm a fan boy, IDC! 

What's unique about making art in NY?
Nothing really, except the fact that you're making art and this time you're surrounded by people who want to eat off of you.

What's been the most significant work or body of work you've made so far?
Definitely my first photo book, El Paquete, which I'm self-publishing. It's entirely new photographs from a month I spent capturing skaters and architecture in Havana, Cuba. Yeah, this book is pretty "come get this".

What do you want to be when you grow up? 
There's no room for choosing what I'll be when I grow up in the sentence: maximum expression while there's air in my lungs. 

***

Name: Caroline David (@c.arolinedavid)

Where's home?
Santa Barbara, CA and San Juan Island, WA. 

If you had to describe your artistic output in five words, what would you call it?
False dimensionality and Earth worship. 

Who inspires you?
My mom, brother, horses, and incredible friends. All of the artists that inspire me bring some kind of imperfect or human quality to otherwise surreal or sublime work. 

What's unique about making art in NY?
It feels like a great deal of people left something they love behind to be here and that really shows in what they do.

What's been the most significant work or body of work you've made so far?
Base Watch, all of my 3D work, and my ceramics all hold a special place in my heart.

What do you want to be when you grow up?
A sculptor. Or maybe a farmer. 

Photos: Instagram and courtesy of the artists. 

Lucy Jones